Would you buy an electric car?

Started by JBR, August 24, 2022, 05:58:04 PM

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JBR

If you drive and are considering, or in need of a new car, would you buy an electric car especially as many manufacturers are no longer selling internal combustion cars?
A missionary from Yorkshire to the primitive people of Lancashire

klondike

I couldn't as I have no driveway so could only charge one on public chargers which while dubbed fast chargers are still a lot slower than filling a fuel tank. The reduced fuel bill is offset to a degree by the high initial cost of the vehicle.

My son has one and the acceleration is brisk indeed. It has lots of "driver assist" features which occasionally try to kill him while the rather conservative safety margins can lead to quite a few angry beeps. He still has his diesel and uses that for holidays as he prefers rural locations and public chargers would be too inconvenient. If holiday lets start offering chargers the electic may become practical.

I don't think there is a cat in hell's chance that the required charging infrastucture will be in place in time. Petrol and diesel are very energy dense. His car battery is 73kWh and the charger 7Kw.

We live in a time when intelligent people are silenced so that stupid people won't be offended

JBR

Thanks klondike.
I agree.  Looking around at how many cars are on the roads, and that most of them are ICE vehicles, I cannot see the government's diktat being feasible in only eight years.

If push came to shove, and they stuck by their word, Marge and I would be looking for a good second-hand car near the time and I'm sure that the other threats of filling stations disappearing is very unlikely.
A missionary from Yorkshire to the primitive people of Lancashire

Ashy

For private motoring an electric car is not practical so I don't think I will require one.

GrannyMac

My son in law has an electric car. Very beneficial tax wise, he runs a business. No road tax, cheaper than petrol to run.
Its not how old you are, but how you are old. 💖

JBR

Quote from: GrannyMac on August 24, 2022, 08:25:37 PMMy son in law has an electric car. Very beneficial tax wise, he runs a business. No road tax, cheaper than petrol to run.
Yes, cheaper to run, but I didn't know they don't have to pay road tax!
I think the two disadvantages are the lack of range and the loss in value after several years when the battery needs replacing.
A missionary from Yorkshire to the primitive people of Lancashire

Raven


Alex

Even if I could afford one I wouldn't !

GrannyMac

Quote from: JBR on August 24, 2022, 08:41:57 PMYes, cheaper to run, but I didn't know they don't have to pay road tax!
I think the two disadvantages are the lack of range and the loss in value after several years when the battery needs replacing.

Exempt as zero emissions. As a car bought through his company, its very tax efficient.  https://www.saffery.com/insights/publications/the-tax-benefits-of-electric-vehicles/
Its not how old you are, but how you are old. 💖

Diasi

Quote from: JBR on August 24, 2022, 08:41:57 PMYes, cheaper to run, but I didn't know they don't have to pay road tax!
I think the two disadvantages are the lack of range and the loss in value after several years when the battery needs replacing.
That's where the scam kicks in, of course the tyres of an electic car do as much road wear as the tyres on a petrol / diesel car but they changed the name from Road Fund to Vehicle Excise Duty so no one, in theory, is paying for the maintenance of the roads, but in practice the ICE driver pays.

It costs £thousands when the battery needs replacing at £87 per kWh (2021 price), plus labour when the car has to be virtually stripped down.
Make every day count, each day is precious.
"Death leaves a heartache no one can heal, love leaves a memory no one can steal".  (Cassandra)

klondike

Most people buying them now will be changing them before the battery capacity warranty runs out. What it will do is destroy the second hand market and price cars out of the reach of the oiks. 

Our great grandchildren will find themselves in a similar world to our parents or grandparents where only the rich own their own transport and houses too come to that. The question for me is will this be a side effect or a part of the actual policy.

For me car ownership spelled freedom and I made damned sure all my children got their driving licences as soon as possible and their own wheels too.

We live in a time when intelligent people are silenced so that stupid people won't be offended

GrannyMac

Many of our children and grandchildren could do well via inheritance.  Our generation was the first to have a majority of home owners.  Unless we are in the unfortunate minority who has to pay for a care home, or dislike our offspring so much we leave everything to a donkey sanctuary, then they should benefit eventually.
Its not how old you are, but how you are old. 💖

Michael Rolls

I have (RELUCTANTLY) a self regenerating, or whatever they call it, hybrid, because what I really wanted was no longer made (petrol, automatic Mondeo hatchback which was this car's predecessor. It cost £8,000 more than what I wanted would have cost, so even doing 50 mpg that represents a lot of miles even at today's prices.
Pure electric, as things stand, would be totally impractical for me; living in a bungalow with plenty of space I could install a home charger - but why the hell should I go to all that trouble and expense, especially when a journey of any length needs military planning!
Mike
Thank you for the days, the days you gave me
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Ashy

I wonder how long battery vehicles will be free of road tax and fuel taxes. I'd guess at Autumn 2024 after the next election.

Michael Rolls

well, the government is going to have to find a way to replace the lost revenue from road tax and fuel duty
Mike
Thank you for the days, the days you gave me
[email protected]