Another Problem

Started by Alex, June 12, 2024, 10:30:04 AM

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Alex

I have a Polish couple living next door really nice people and we get on well.  A Young tree has appeared in his front garden next to my wall and about 3 feet from both houses.  When I asked him about it a few months ago he said he had no idea where it came from.  Now the thing is shooting up and last week I said he should really get rid of it.  He said he intended to keep the height down but I told him the roots were more of a problem.

He's made no effort to remove the tree, which my neighbour the other side tells me is a Birch.   I don't want to fall out with him, we've been good neighbours for about 5 years or more.

Any suggestions to what I can do ?

ps photo to follow

klondike

Personally I'd forget it unless it does look like it will be a problem. Better to be friends with neighbours than fall out over something that is only a possible problem years down the line.

That said...

https://schoolgardening.rhs.org.uk/resources/info-sheet/silver-birch#:~:text=Birch%20trees%20grow%20quickly%20reaching,arching%20branches%20and%20hanging%20twigs.

Birch trees grow quickly reaching 8m tall with a 3m spread in 10 years, 18m x 4m in 20 years and 25m x 10m ultimately. Mature trees form a narrow, conical shape with arching branches and hanging twigs.

Could be an issue sooner than I thought

Alex

I thought trees should never be planted next to house walls because the roots can damage foundations ?

klondike

If it's only 3m away I doubt it will be allowed to get big enough to damage foundations. 

As I said I'd wait. You've mentioned it once. I'm not convinced that he didn't set it either. It can't be often that trees self set in front lawns. Never in my own experiecence at least.

Alex


problem solve hopefully !

Mups

Quote from: Alex on June 12, 2024, 10:45:04 AMI thought trees should never be planted next to house walls because the roots can damage foundations ?


You're absolutely right, Alex.  
Having said that, it would also depend on some extent, to what type of tree it is.
Some are deep rooted, and others the roots spread like veins,  rather than go down deep.

I am speaking from experience because I had 3 different neighbours with huge trees, and in the end they started cracking the walls of my house.

To cut a long story short,  after several years of arguing with my Insurance company  (they do anything to wriggle out of coughing up),  eventually they sent someone out to dig down and they found SEVEN lots of different tree roots under my kitchen floor!  

All sorted eventually,  but not without some bad feeling.   It was a nightmare though.

dextrous63

Quote from: Alex on June 12, 2024, 11:46:27 AMproblem solve hopefully !
How?

Have they agreed to get rid of it, or move it?

Alex

I went round to see him again today and just asked if he'd 'forgotten' about the tree, he said he'd been busy but would dig it out by the end of the month.  He's really a nice fella so hope he does shift it.

JBR

Quote from: Alex on June 12, 2024, 08:48:21 PMI went round to see him again today and just asked if he'd 'forgotten' about the tree, he said he'd been busy but would dig it out by the end of the month.  He's really a nice fella so hope he does shift it.
If it bothers you, and it is to your advantage for it to be removed, you could offer to go halves with him to have it professionally removed.
A missionary from Yorkshire to the primitive people of Lancashire

Alex

Yes I would do that, see if he shifts it himself first.  I did offer to send my son to help, but he said it wasn't necessary.

Scrumpy


I have a Silver Birch in my front garden.. about 10 feet away from the house.. She is beautiful..
I learned that a Silver Birch is unlikely to cause damage with their roots..
My first husband (Harry) was a builder.. He never worried about the Birch tree.. 
Don't ask me.. I know nuffink..

muddy

Silver birch although beautiful seek water and will invade and block drains and sewers .

Scrumpy


That's interesting..  
Don't ask me.. I know nuffink..

Vlad

From gocompare house insurance

Key points
  • Having trees over 10 metres tall or very close to the walls of your home could mean you pay higher premiums
  • You'll usually need to claim on your own home insurance if a neighbour's tree falls and damages your house
  • Home insurance usually only covers the cost of damage to your home caused by a tree and not its removal to prevent future damage
"I am in awe of myself. I never know what I will write next."

klondike

One of the problems with big trees is the amount of water they take from the soil leading to subsistence. I don't think small ornamental trees are any problem at all. Unless and until they grow into big trees.